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Has Keynesian Economics Finally Jumped the Shark?

If everyone has a cross to bear in life, mine is the perplexing durability of Keynesian economics. I thought the idea was dead when Keynesians incorrectly said you couldn’t have simultaneously rising inflation and unemployment like we saw in the 1970s. Then I thought the idea was buried even deeper when the Keynesians were wrong […]

Continue reading Has Keynesian Economics Finally Jumped the Shark?

Has Keynesian Economics Finally Jumped the Shark?

If everyone has a cross to bear in life, mine is the perplexing durability of Keynesian economics. I thought the idea was dead when Keynesians incorrectly said you couldn’t have simultaneously rising inflation and unemployment like we saw in the 1970s. Then I thought the idea was buried even deeper when the Keynesians were wrong […]

Continue reading Has Keynesian Economics Finally Jumped the Shark?

The War against Cash, Part II

I wrote yesterday that governments want to eliminate cash in order to make it easier to squeeze more money from taxpayers. But that’s not the only reason why politicians are interested in banning paper money and coins. They also are worried that paper money inhibits the government’s ability to “stimulate” the economy with artificially low […]

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More Keynesian Primitivism from the Congressional Budget Office

I never watched That ’70s Show, but according to Wikipedia, the comedy program “addressed social issues of the 1970s.” Assuming that’s true, they need a sequel that addresses economic issues of the 1970s. And the star of the program could be the Congressional Budget Office, a Capitol Hill bureaucracy that apparently still believes – notwithstanding […]

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The Economist and New York Times Channel Fox Butterfield on Keynesian Policy

Back in 2010, I described the “Butterfield Effect,” which is a term used to mock clueless journalists for being blind to the real story. A former reporter for the New York Times, Fox Butterfield, became a bit of a laughingstock in the 1990s for publishing a series of articles addressing the supposed quandary of how crime […]

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More Evidence against Big-Spending Keynesian Economics

Keynesian economics is a perpetual-motion machine for statists. The way to boost growth, they argue, is to have governments borrow lots of money from the economy’s productive sector and then spend it on anything and everything. Even if the money is squandered on global defense against a make-believe alien attack, according to Keynesians like Paul […]

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