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The Recipe for Job Creation: Less “Help” from Washington

The American economy is in the doldrums. And has been for most this century thanks to bad policy under both Obama and Bush. So what’s needed to boost growth and create jobs? A new video from Learn Liberty, narrated by Professor Don Boudreaux (who also was the narrator for Learn Liberty’s superb video on free […]

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Japan and the IMF: A Match Made in Keynesian Hell

Japan is the poster child for Keynesian economics. Ever since a bubble popped about 25 years ago, Japanese politician have adopted one so-called stimulus scheme after another. Lots of additional government spending. Plenty of gimmicky tax cuts. All of which were designed according to the Keynesian theory that presumes that governments should borrow money and […]

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Disentangling Keynesian Fiscal Policy

At the risk of understatement, I’m not a fan of Keynesian economics. The disdain is even apparent in the titles of my columns. Notwithstanding Keynesian Fantasies, Redistribution Does Not Stimulate Growth Japan’s Descent into Keynesian Parody Has Keynesian Economics Finally Jumped the Shark? More Keynesian Primitivism from the Congressional Budget Office The Perplexing Durability of […]

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Demographics, Insufficient Reform, and the Grim Outlook for Eastern Europe

Changing demographics is one of the most powerful arguments for genuine entitlement reform. When programs such as Social Security and Medicare (and equivalent systems in other nations) were first created, there were lots of young people and comparatively few old people. And so long as a “population pyramid” was the norm, reasonably sized welfare states […]

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More Hack Analysis from the IMF

The International Monetary Fund is a left-leaning bureaucracy that was set up to monitor the fixed-exchange-rate monetary system created after World War II. Unsurprisingly, when that system broke down and the world shifted to floating exchange rates, the IMF didn’t go away. Instead, it created a new role for itself as self-styled guardian of economic […]

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A Semi-Acceptable Indirect Bailout for Puerto Rico?

I wrote last year about why Puerto Rico got into fiscal trouble. Like Greece and so many other governments, it did the opposite of Mitchell’s Golden Rule. Instead of a multi-year period of spending restraint, it allowed the budget to expand faster than the private sector for almost two decades. As the old saying goes, […]

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