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Petit Tyrants

Learning the Right Lesson from Corruption in the EB-5 Visa Program

As an economist, my primary objection to excessive government is – or at least should be – based on foregone growth. After all, government spending (whether it is financed by taxes or borrowing) diverts resources from the productive sector of society and results in the misallocation of labor and capital. Based on my blood pressure, […]

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Jobs Alone Aren’t The Answer

This is, as always from Amity Shlaes, excellent. It has often seemed to me that our politicians think the electorate is very stupid, not to mention having no memory at all. While this seems more obvious on Democratic side of the aisle, it’s pretty bipartisan, as watch Congress continually indulge in get-rich quick schemes for […]

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The First Gasoline Tax: Less Than Romantic (Oregon: 1919) – Master Resource

View image | gettyimages.com Did you ever wonder how the gas tax came about? I did occasionally but never enough to study it and find out. Not surprisingly it turn out to be a sordid story of self-interest and government cronyism. From Masterresource. “I was asked to draw a state highway map that would win […]

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Reforming Chinese Courts: A Fool’s Errand?

With Chinese courts revising more than 1,300 criminal decisions in 2014, the chief justice of the Supreme People’s Court, Zhou Qiang, told the national legislature in March 2015, “With regard to wrongful convictions, we feel a deep sense of self-blame and demand that courts at all levels draw a profound lesson.”[1]Six months earlier, President Xi Jinping had initiated legal reforms on the premise that the Communist Party needed a “better-functioning” legal system in order to be able to govern.[2]The question is whether this push will come to anything substantial.


The full essay is at “Reforming Chinese Courts.”



1. Josh Chin, “Top Judge Apologizes for Wrongful Convictions,” The Wall Street Journal, March 13, 2015.

2. Ibid.

Continue reading Reforming Chinese Courts: A Fool’s Errand?

Reforming Chinese Courts: A Fool’s Errand?

With Chinese courts revising more than 1,300 criminal decisions in 2014, the chief justice of the Supreme People’s Court, Zhou Qiang, told the national legislature in March 2015, “With regard to wrongful convictions, we feel a deep sense of self-blame and demand that courts at all levels draw a profound lesson.”[1]Six months earlier, President Xi Jinping had initiated legal reforms on the premise that the Communist Party needed a “better-functioning” legal system in order to be able to govern.[2]The question is whether this push will come to anything substantial.


The full essay is at “Reforming Chinese Courts.”



1. Josh Chin, “Top Judge Apologizes for Wrongful Convictions,” The Wall Street Journal, March 13, 2015.

2. Ibid.

Continue reading Reforming Chinese Courts: A Fool’s Errand?

Knock Off The Loser Talk.

Those of you who have been reading here for a time will likely have noted that I’ve cut back on political content.There are a couple reasons for that, a lot of the time it is the same old, same old, there are few people in it (more than there used to be though) that I consider […]

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