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Jeff Sessions, existential threat

Stephen Dinan’s article highlights how little leverage Democrats have in the immigration reform debate. Without writing a single new law, Sen. Sessions will be able to pressure mayors of sanctuary cities. As a result, Sen. Sessions’ opponents are coming unhinged.

For instance, Brent Wilkes, the executive director of the League of United Latin American Citizens, said “the agency would become the dispenser of terror and racial intolerance should Jeff Sessions be confirmed.” That’s mild compared with what Charles Chamberlain, head of Democracy for America, said. Chamberlain said “The handful of people who might be even less equipped than Jeff Sessions to dispense justice on behalf of the American people typically spend their weekends wearing pointy hats and burning crosses.”

Democrats are preparing to fight a losing fight against Sen. Sessions’ confirmation as the next US Attorney General. Sen. Sessions will be confirmed. The only question still undetermined is whether Democrats will do as La Raza and other special interests demand or whether they’ll vote to protect their constituents. At this point, I’m betting that they’ll follow these special interest organizations over a political cliff.

Byron York’s article lists some of the things that Sen. Sessions could do the minute he’s sworn in as the next US Attorney General.

There are laws providing for the deportation of people who entered the U.S. illegally. Laws providing for the deportation of people who entered the U.S. illegally and later committed crimes. Laws for enforcing immigration compliance at the worksite. Laws for immigrants who have illegally overstayed their visas for coming to the United States. Laws requiring local governments to comply with federal immigration law. And more.

Many of those laws have been loosened or, in some cases, completely ignored by the Obama administration. A Trump administration would not need to ask Congress to pass any new laws to deal with illegal immigration. If there was a presidential order involved in Obama’s non-enforcement, Trump could undo it, and if there were Justice Department directives involved, Sessions could undo them, and if there are Department of Homeland Security directives involved, the still-to-be-nominated secretary could undo them.

Once those laws are enforced, illegal immigration will slow to a trickle.

This would definitely change behavior:

End the embargo on worksite enforcement. “Experience has shown that employers respond very quickly and voluntarily implement compliance measures when there is an uptick in enforcement,” Vaughan notes, “because they see the potential damage to their operations and public image for being caught and prosecuted.”

Once cheap labor becomes expensive, corporate policies change quickly. That’s because companies prefer making profits rather than not making profits.

It isn’t a secret why the Democrats’ special interest groups are fighting Sen. Sessions’ confirmation. They’re right in seeing him as an existential threat to their policies. Here’s hoping that the American people punish Democrats for not fixing this crisis.

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Authored By Let Freedom Ring Blog